Reporting guides on Hinduism

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    Reporting on hate speech

    In 2010, a Florida pastor with just a few dozen followers attracted international media coverage when he announced plans to burn copies of the Quran on the anniversary of 9/11. By taking the bait, media outlets became complicit in advancing his hate-filled agenda, making Terry Jones a household name in the U.S. and far beyond. […]

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Stylebook entries on Hinduism

Pronounced “AARa-tee.” In Hinduism, the most common ritual that is performed in front of the image of a deity, whether in a temple or in a home shrine. It typically consists of waving, in a clockwise motion, various items in front of the deity. It is done in conjunction with mantras or prayers.
Pronounced “ah-HIM-saa.” The Sanskrit word meaning non-injury in any form, including action, thought or speech. This is an important principle of Hinduism and a core principle of Jainism. For this reason, many Hindus and most Jains are vegetarians, as are significant numbers of Sikhs and Buddhists.
The essential, eternal self or soul in Hinduism.
Pronounced “AV-uh-taar.” Avatars are incarnations of God, who Hindus believe come to Earth at various times to promote dharma and righteousness and to alleviate suffering.
Bhagavad Gita
Pronounced “BAH-gah-vahd GEE-tah.” One of the most popular Hindu scriptures, it literally means “Song of the Lord.” It is in the form of a conversation between Lord Krishna (an avatar of Lord Vishnu) and Arjuna on the great battlefield at Kurukshetra just before the famous war in the Mahabharata. In the conversation, Lord Krishna illuminates Arjuna on righteous action that is conducive to the well-being of the world and spiritual liberation (moksha), and instructs him on karma yoga (the path of self-transcending action), samkhya yoga (the path of discerning the principles of existence correctly), jnana yoga (the path of wisdom), raja yoga (the path of knowledge) and bhakti yoga (the path of devotion).

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Organizations on Hinduism

  • Yoga of Love

    Yoga of Love is an organization in Jerusalem that encourages mental and physical improvements in daily life through the integration of daily yoga. The website provides information and resources on the philosophies of yoga, such as vegetarianism, education for universal values, relationship building, community life and social contribution.

  • Ashram Vrajabhumi

    Ashram Vrajabhumi is an organization in Brazil that offers resources for “simple living and high thinking” through Hindu meditation and prayer.

  • Sri Gaudiya Matha Gaurava

    Sri Gaudiya Matha Gaurava offers resources on the Gaudiya Vaishnava philosophy, festivals, news and practices, and is based in Rio de Janeiro.

  • Argentina Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center

    The Argentina Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center is an organization that promotes Hinduism and Hindu Dharma throughout Argentina. The website offers current news articles, additional associations on Hinduism and resources on celebrations and festivals.

  • Hindu Society of Berbice

    The Hindu Society of Berbice is a nonprofit religious organization in Guyana that promotes and preserves Sanatan Dharma and Hindu culture by engaging its community in Hindu projects, programs and activities.

    Contact: 592-333-3429.

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FAQs on Hinduism

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Books on Hinduism

  • The Puranas

    The Puranas are a narrative of the history of the cosmos from creation to destruction. There are 17 or 18 divided into categories named for the Hindu deities Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva.

  • The Vedas

    The Vedas are the primary texts of Hinduism and are among the oldest sacred texts in all the world’s religions, with the oldest of them composed about 1500 B.C. There are four Vedas: the Rig Veda, the Sama Veda, the Yajur Veda and the Atharva Veda.

  • The Vishnu Purana

    This is a translation of the Vishnu Purana by Horace Hayman Wilson.

  • The Garuda Purana

    This is a translation by Ernest Wood of an abridged version of the Garuda Purana.

  • The S’rîmad Devî Bhâgawatam

    This is a translation of the S’rimad Devi Bhagawatam by Swami Vijnanananada.

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