Reporting guides on Hinduism

  • Reporting on hate speech

    In 2010, a Florida pastor with just a few dozen followers attracted international media coverage when he announced plans to burn copies of the Quran on the anniversary of 9/11. By taking the bait, media outlets became complicit in advancing his hate-filled agenda, making Terry Jones a household name in the U.S. and far beyond. […]

    Continue reading

More reporting guides on Hinduism

Source guides on Hinduism

Posted on

Covering creation care in the age of Donald Trump

President Donald Trump has undone or renegotiated many of his predecessor’s environmentally friendly policies, removing climate change research from government websites and pulling out of the Paris climate agreement. Religiously inspired environmental activists have emerged as some of his loudest critics.

Continue reading

Stylebook entries on Hinduism

aarti
Pronounced “AARa-tee.” In Hinduism, the most common ritual that is performed in front of the image of a deity, whether in a temple or in a home shrine. It typically consists of waving, in a clockwise motion, various items in front of the deity. It is done in conjunction with mantras or prayers.
ahimsa
Pronounced “ah-HIM-saa.” The Sanskrit word meaning non-injury in any form, including action, thought or speech. This is an important principle of Hinduism and a core principle of Jainism. For this reason, many Hindus and most Jains are vegetarians, as are significant numbers of Sikhs and Buddhists.
Atman
The essential, eternal self or soul in Hinduism.
avatar
Pronounced “AV-uh-taar.” Avatars are incarnations of God, who Hindus believe come to Earth at various times to promote dharma and righteousness and to alleviate suffering.
Bhagavad Gita
Pronounced “BAH-gah-vahd GEE-tah.” One of the most popular Hindu scriptures, it literally means “Song of the Lord.” It is in the form of a conversation between Lord Krishna (an avatar of Lord Vishnu) and Arjuna on the great battlefield at Kurukshetra just before the famous war in the Mahabharata. In the conversation, Lord Krishna illuminates Arjuna on righteous action that is conducive to the well-being of the world and spiritual liberation (moksha), and instructs him on karma yoga (the path of self-transcending action), samkhya yoga (the path of discerning the principles of existence correctly), jnana yoga (the path of wisdom), raja yoga (the path of knowledge) and bhakti yoga (the path of devotion).

More source guides on Hinduism

Organizations on Hinduism

  • The Bhumi Project

    The Bhumi Project seeks to rally Hindus worldwide in support of the environment. The organization is overseen by the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies in partnership with GreenFaith.

  • PICO National Network

    PICO National Network is a network of faith-based community organizations. It was one of the leaders of the 40 Days for Health Reform campaign. Gordon Whitman is director of public policy and communications. Contact 866-550-7426 ext. 713.

  • South Asian Journalists Association

    The South Asian Journalists Association posts links to Hindu community leaders across the United States and provides resources on legal issues, immigration and hate crimes as they relate to South Asians, including Hindus.

  • Hindupedia

    Hindupedia is a Wiki-style online encyclopedia of Hindusim.

  • Shaivam.org

    Shaivam.org is a website dedicated to all things regarding worship of the deity Shiva.

More organizations on Hinduism

FAQs on Hinduism

More FAQs on Hinduism